Product Support

Product Support
A description has not yet been added to this group.

PC will not boot unless I unplug the power.

  • I am in serious need of help. I have changed almost everything in my comp out and I still have the same problem. Sometimes when reboot or shutdown the computer won't reboot/shutdown at all. I have tried everything. When it does act up, The light on my power button will stay on constantly. Normally when it does reboot the power button will blink then boot up with no problem.  When it doesn't boot I hold the power button to turn it off, turn off my power supply for about 5 secs. then turn it back on and it will boot up normally.  I have changed out the psu, motherboard, ram,and the hdd. I have also disconnected my dvd drive to eliminate that. I ran a test on the cpu using hot cpu tester. I just don't know what else to do at this point.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated.



    [edited by: klabit87]
  • Make sure that its not shorting out at all like the brass standoffs to the I/O plate on the back of the case has to be away from the mobo. Run memtest86 just to make sure that the RAM is ok as well. Check temps as well CPU especially.

     

  • I have run a memtest and it has checked out good with no errors. My cpu runs about 30 to 38C at idle and around 45 to 50C at full load. Should I get some of those cardboard washers? This is the second mobo I have had with this same problem. I am about ready to rma the cpu to eliminate that as the cause.
  • Also I have installed windows xp and windows 7 multiple times and it will run fine for a couple of hours or so and then it will act up. So it doesn't happen everytime I reboot. It only happens when it has been running for a while, I check my temps and they are fine. Then I reboot and it gets stuck so I have to turn my psu off for about 5 secs. and then it runs fine for a bit more.
  • Ok yep your temps are fine. What PSU did you have before the one you have now? I would not use the cardboard washers they don't help, but you may want to check and make sure each standoff is tight to the chasse. I would RMA the CPU back just in case but I don't think that is the issue, it sounds more like the PSU.

  • First I had a cheapo Rosewill 600W PSU and I thought that would have been my problem but I RMA'd it and got a OCZ 600W I figured it would be better quality. And I checked my voltages via SpeedFan and they were all the same as my Rosewill PSU. I know it isn't very accurate but if they are the same then it should be okay right? I will check my standoffs though. Could a screw being too tight to the mobo be the problem? I tightened them until I felt tension but I made sure not to get them too tight.
  • OK well yes that is an upgrade then from one PSU to the next and the OCZ is a bit better. As for the screw being too tight well no if the sand off is loose then that can be a problem and create a short out to the motherboard. As for the voltage as long as its where it needs to be then you will be fine.

  • Ok thanks for your advice. I probably won't be able to take everything apart until this weekend but in the meantime I am running a full 6 hour diagnostic in Hot CPU Tester Pro and then let it idle for a few hours. Then I want to run a 24 hour burn-in on the CPU. If it can handle that much with no BSOD's or just completely shutting down, the CPU should be fine then. I will post more sometime this weekend when I check all of my standoffs.
  • What graphics card(s)?

    Any other hard drives?  optical Drives?

     

    Your power supply has 4x 18 amp rails.  It would be pretty easy to overpower the rating of a single rail, which can cause a variety of malfunctions.  I doubt that's what is causing your problem.

    Take your CPU out of the case and run it on top of a piece of clean cardboard or other non-conductive surface.  If it runs fine, then you know you have a shorting problem, which is a much more likely cause of your problem.  When you have the mobo out, look at the bottom to see if there are any abnormally long pins or solder blobs that could be touching below the standoffs.

    I put two layers of electrical tape over the standoffs (doesn't have to be pretty, just stretch a strip over and let it stick to the back plate) and use a fiber wafer above the board.  I drive the mounting screws through the electrical tape.  Do that just to remove one source of problem from the equation.

    Inspect the wires on all your fans, particularly any that are connected to the mobo for power (like the CPU fan) and be sure that none of them are damaged.

     

  • Ok last night I was running the CPU test and I set it so that it could sleep an hour after it was finished testing. Well this morning when I turned it on it didn't do anything but the power button was on, all fans were turning, and the hdd light was on steady, same things that has been happening. But this time I got a window that describes my problem. the window states as follows:

     

    Problem Event Name: BlueScreen

    OS Version 6.1.7600.2.0.0.256.1

    LocaleID: 1033

    More Info About the Problem:

    BCCode: 9f

    BCP1: 00000003

    BCP2: 8559D528

    BCP3: 82B74AE0

    BCP4: 87866920

    OS Version: 6_1_7600

    Service Pack 0_0

    Product 256_1

    Files that help describe the problem:

    It provides the location to 2 files and dump file and a sysdata.xml file

    neither of which do I know how to open.

     

    Maybe this info will help?

  • klabit87:

    Problem Event Name: BlueScreen

    OS Version 6.1.7600.2.0.0.256.1

    LocaleID: 1033

    More Info About the Problem:

    BCCode: 9f

    BCP1: 00000003

    BCP2: 8559D528

    BCP3: 82B74AE0

    BCP4: 87866920

    OS Version: 6_1_7600

    Service Pack 0_0

    Product 256_1

    The BCCODE is what we do need the 9f or 0X00000009f is the BSOD.

    Code 9f BSOD almost always points to a pure hardware problem causing a
    forced shutdown for a few reasons.

    The most common are:

    1. Grounding problem with your case - Your motherboard is seated improperly
    on the brass motherboard standoffs, and it is causing a short on the
    motherboard. This can also affect how well any expansion cards or video
    cards sit in their slots. Try reseating the motherboard or booting it
    outside the case on a non-metal surface (preferably the non-static bag it
    was wrapped in).
    If its still shorting out when you place it in the case, try using the
    plastic or paper spacers that sometimes come with a case, or using big
    squares of electrical tape on top of the standoffs and screw right through
    them.
    2. No fan plugged into cpu fan header - You need a fan (any small fan will
    do) plugged into the CPU fan header initially until you turn off fan
    monitoring in the bios.
    3. ATX 12v connector unplugged - You forgot to plug in the square 4 pin
    power plug with 2 yellow and 2 black wires. It is located behind the
    heatsink bracket, near the top left corner of the motherboard. THIS THE MOST
    COMMON CODE 9.F PROBLEM.
    4. Heatsink bracket overtightened - The screws should only be barely
    tightened, NOT tightened to the point the screws can't turn anymore. When
    overtightened, it will cause the motherboard to warp near the RAM sockets,
    and the RAM will not seat properly (especially in the middle). Make sure and
    support the board with your fingers underneath the RAM sockets gently
    applying pressure while you insert the RAM. This problem is also associated
    with code 0.4
    5. The only other issue that code 9.F refers to is insufficient power. Make
    sure your PSU meets the minimum requirements of atleast 350 to 400 watts and
    18-20 amps on the 12v rail. For High-end setups with multiple hard drives,
    high-end video cards (especially Geforce 6xxx series), multiple case fans
    and/or lights, make sure you have atleast 400 watts and 22 to 24 amps on the
    12v rail. If the PSU has 2 rails, add them and make sure they meet the
    minimum."

    Check out these sources.

  • Okay. I have taken the mobo out and put pieces of electrical tape on the standoffs and it still does the same thing. My mobo has an 8pin connector for the cpu. My PSU has a 8pin connector grouped together, one labeled CPU 1 and the other labeled CPU 2. First I had both connected and with this current problem. So I disconnected one of them, I figured that the worst that could happen is it wouldn't POST but it did boot up and everything. I have requested an RMA and I should be getting my replacement in by Friday or Saturday. So I will have to wait until then. Thanks for all the help guys
  • Don't be shocked that it is your PSU.  If you have access to a single rail higher amp PSU to test, that would be optimal.
  • I am going to change out the cpu first. I just don't see 2 very different psu's exhibiting the exact same problems.
  • klabit87:
    I am going to change out the cpu first. I just don't see 2 very different psu's exhibiting the exact same problems.

    Don't be surprised but yes that can happen. Also I have noticed you are running a onboard video card as well so that will not draw too much power.