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WD VelociRaptor 74GB 10000 RPM HD vs a SSD

  • Okay, I was originally looking at getting an SSD for a boot drive, but then I started looking at stuff like this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136744. I figured I would buy two of these and use one as a boot drive for my OS and another one strictly dedicated for a game I play. 

    Apparently this thing is extremely fast compared to a 7200RPM drive. How much faster is a similar SSD drive around the same storage capacity? Is one truly better than the other? Also, I noticed the Veloci was a sata 3.0. What is the difference between 3.0 and 6.0? Does that mean it transfers data at a slower rate?



    [edited by: mpereau88]
  • SSD's are faster than 10,000RPM traditional hard drives.

    SATA 3.0 & 6.0 is the data interface for the drive. For traditional hard drives it doesn't matter which one you go with; you wont see a performance gain. However with SSD's it's recommended to go with the 6.0 interface over the 3.0 interface (assuming you even have a motherboard with those ports).

     



    [edited by: IronMan77, IronMan77]
  • Get the SSD.Way faster.
  • Is there is huge difference between the speeds? Also looking at some of these drives some of them say OEM at the end. Does that mean they dont come with any cables?
  • Look at the benchmarks yourself and decide lol... 

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/4346/ocz-agility-3-240gb-review/8

    Usually OEM or bare drive won't come with a sata cable or shouldn't at least, but you may get lucky. Your motherboard box should come with a couple though.

  • Okay. Lets say that I have an SSD and a regular HD. I have my SSD as my boot drive for my OS and I copy my OS folder to my other HD. If for some reason, my SSD fails would I be able to boot my OS that I copied to my regular HD?
  • mpereau88:
    Okay. Lets say that I have an SSD and a regular HD. I have my SSD as my boot drive for my OS and I copy my OS folder to my other HD. If for some reason, my SSD fails would I be able to boot my OS that I copied to my regular HD?

    nope

  • A better method for backup is to install your OS onto the SSD, then use Windows 7 to create an image of the fresh install.
    You can do this via Control Panel >> System & Security >> Backup and Restore >> Create System Image.

    Save the image to your secondary hard drive, and then in the event of a virus/SSD failure/etc. you will be able to use the Windows installation DVD to boot, access the image from your storage drive, and re-load it onto the SSD.

    And yes, SSDs simply run circles around mechanical HDDs, even WD's excellent 10,000RPM Velociraptors. The difference is night-and-day with a good SSD, particularly if you've used it for a while and then go back to a system running off of a mechanical... oh the pain...

    Hope this helps!

    Best Regards,
    Paul